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Which type of mouthwash is best?

November 24th, 2021

Taking care of your oral health involves a daily regimen of brushing, flossing, and rinsing to prevent tooth decay and bacterial infections. Though you may have asked us which toothbrush to use, few patients at Dalessandro Implants & Periodontics ask about mouthwash.

However, different mouthwashes you might choose will have varying effects on your oral health. So which type is best for you?

Gum Health

Antiseptic mouthwashes are designed to reduce the majority of bacteria on and near the gum line. Using an antiseptic mouthwash can help decrease your chances of developing gingivitis. If possible, look for a mouthwash with antibacterial or antimicrobial ingredients.

Fluoride

Fluoride is beneficial for oral health and can help prevent tooth decay. If you drink a lot of bottled water without fluoride, we may recommend that you purchase a rinse with fluoride in it.

Bad Breath

Although mouthwash is designed to prevent bacterial build-up within the mouth, many people use it to combat bad breath. Most mouthwashes will help eliminate the bacteria that cause bad breath, and some are specifically designed to do so.

However, if bad breath is a chronic problem that requires daily treatment with a mouth rinse, contact Dalessandro Implants & Periodontics to discuss your symptoms.

American Dental Association Approval

The ADA reviews mouth rinses for safety and effectiveness. A mouthwash with the ADA Seal of Approval will meet strict criteria, and will have scientific evidence or clinical studies that support the claims of the manufacturer. If possible, select a mouthwash that bears the ADA Seal of Approval to ensure you are using a quality rinse.

Considerations

If you are unsure as to which mouthwash is right for you, contact our Hoffman Estates, IL office or ask Dr. Dalessandro during your next visit. Also, be sure to keep mouthwash out of the reach of children, as it contains alcohol and other substances that could be harmful to them. Avoid letting children under age six use a mouth rinse, and discontinue use if you experience a burning sensation in the soft tissues of your mouth.

Persistent Bad Breath? It Could Be Time to Talk to Your Periodontist

November 17th, 2021

Part of presenting our best faces to the world is making sure our smiles are bright and our breath is fresh. Sure, we’ve all been embarrassed by an occasional pungent reminder of that garlic bread we just couldn’t pass up, but with daily brushing and flossing, fresh breath is the norm. Until it isn’t.

If you’ve been carefully avoiding strong foods in your diet, if you’ve started brushing a lot more often, if you’re relying on mints and mouthwash to get you through the day, and you still have bad breath, it’s time to see your dentist or doctor.

Chronic bad breath can be a symptom of tooth decay, dry mouth, oral infections, diabetes, kidney disease, and many other medical or dental problems. It can also be a red flag for serious gum disease, or periodontitis.

How does gum disease cause persistent bad breath? The bacteria and plaque that we are careful to brush away from the surface of our teeth can also stick below the gum line. These bacteria irritate the tissues around them, and the area becomes inflamed. Pockets form around the teeth where bacteria collect and multiply, becoming the source of that unpleasant odor.

And, while bad breath is an embarrassing consequence of gum disease, there are other consequences that are far more serious. Infection causes inflammation, and untreated infection and inflammation lead to the breakdown of gum and bone tissue and, eventually, even tooth loss.

If your dentist discovers signs of advanced gum disease, it’s time to give a periodontist like Dr. Dalessandro a call! Because this dental specialty requires three additional years of study after dental school, focusing on the treatment of periodontal disease and cosmetic restorations, periodontists have the knowledge and experience to treat the cause of your gum disease and to restore your gum and bone health.

What can your periodontist do for you? Periodontists are skilled in many procedures that can be used to save gums and teeth, including:

  • Antibiotic therapy, which can be used alone or with other procedures to treat periodontitis.
  • Non-surgical treatments, such as scaling and root planing, which remove plaque and tartar from areas of the teeth above and below the gum line and clean and smooth tooth surfaces.
  • Flap surgery, which allows the periodontist to remove tartar, smooth any irregular tooth surfaces, and then reposition the gum tissue snugly around the teeth to eliminate pockets where bacteria can multiply.
  • Bone and gum grafts, bone surgery, and surgical tissue regeneration, to replace and repair damaged bone and gum tissue.

If you are experiencing persistent bad breath, talk to your dentist or doctor about the possible causes, and whether a visit to our Hoffman Estates, IL office is in order. Periodontal treatment can stop the progression of gum disease, and even restore damaged tissue and bone to make sure you keep your teeth for a lifetime. And one additional bonus? The return of your bright smile and fresh breath. Let your periodontist help you breathe easy once again!

Sedation Options for Your Periodontal Procedure

November 10th, 2021

There are many understandable reasons why you might be feeling less than enthusiastic about your upcoming periodontal treatment.  Perhaps anxiety is an issue, or your teeth are extremely sensitive. You may have a low pain threshold, an easily triggered gag reflex, or require longer or more complex work during your visit. These are also excellent reasons to consider sedation dentistry.

Of course, Dr. Dalessandro will always try our best to make sure that every procedure is pain free. A local anesthetic will be provided to numb the treatment area completely. You might decide that this all that you need, especially for relatively simple procedures. But if you would prefer to remain completely aware, but feel less anxious, if you would like deep sedation throughout the entire procedure, or if you want something in between, talk to us about making sedation part of your treatment.

The most common methods of sedation include:

  • Oral Sedation

Usually, oral medications that reduce anxiety are given in pill form. The level of sedation and how much you will be aware during your procedure will depend on the dosage, and you will need time to recover from the drug’s effects after we are done.

  • Nitrous Oxide

Commonly referred to as “laughing gas,” this has been used since the 1800’s to relieve dental anxiety and reduce pain.  Today’s equipment is designed to provide a precise mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen inhaled through a mask that you will wear throughout the procedure. Once the mask is removed, you will recover quickly.

  • IV Sedation

Medication will be delivered through an intravenous line placed in a vein. This delivery system allows the sedative to take effect very quickly, unlike oral sedation, and adjustments to the sedation level can be made throughout the procedure. This method will also require recovery time when your work is complete.

Because your concerns and condition are unique, we will tailor your sedation to fit your specific needs, and our experience and training enable us to recommend the sedation that is best for you. We will take a careful health history to make sure that whichever medication is used won’t interact with your other medications or affect any pre-existing medical conditions.

Our Hoffman Estates, IL office is trained to administer and monitor all these forms of sedation. Because sedation is a regular part of our practice, we have the medical knowledge and skill to provide you with a safe and comfortable periodontal experience. If you think sedation dentistry might be right for you, this procedure is something we are happy to discuss before your appointment.

Has Your Dentist Recommended a Periodontal Consultation?

November 3rd, 2021

The best way to protect yourself from gum disease is to be proactive: practice good oral hygiene at home and schedule regular checkups and cleanings in your dentist’s office.

How do you know if your dental routine is doing the job? There are specific symptoms you might notice when you brush and floss, and less obvious signs of gum disease your dentist will look for during your dental exams.

The early stage of gum disease is known as gingivitis. It’s generally caused by poor dental hygiene, although certain diseases, age, hormones, and a number of other factors can also put you at risk. It’s time to talk to your dentist about your gum health if you notice any of these symptoms:

  • Bright red or purple gums
  • Swollen gums
  • Pain or tenderness
  • Bleeding when brushing or flossing
  • Persistent bad breath
  • Receding gums

And sometimes, there are no obvious symptoms at all. That’s why regular checkups are so important. If you have gingivitis, careful attention to your oral hygiene, professional cleaning, prescription mouthwash, or other treatments as needed can reverse the effects of gingivitis and restore your gums to their normal, healthy state.

Why be so proactive? Because, left untreated, gingivitis leads to more serious gum disease, called periodontitis.

The bacteria in plaque and tartar cause inflammation, and inflammation leads the gum tissue to pull away from the teeth, forming pockets which become deeper over time. Here, where brushing can’t reach, bacteria continue to multiply, leading to further inflammation, infection, and the eventual breakdown of gum and bone tissues.

The results of untreated periodontitis can be very serious, including:

  • Significant gum recession, leaving roots more vulnerable to decay
  • Periodontal abscesses
  • Loose teeth, or teeth that shift from their proper positions
  • Bone loss in the area surrounding the teeth
  • Tooth loss

If your dentist sees signs of advanced gum disease, you may be referred to our Hoffman Estates, IL periodontal office.

Periodontists like Dr. Dalessandro specialize in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of gum disease. After dental school, a periodontal degree requires three years of additional advanced education. Periodontists have the training and skill to perform surgical and non-surgical procedures to treat gum disease, as well as to perform cosmetic procedures and place dental implants.

Periodontists are trained to diagnose and treat periodontitis with a number of procedures which they will recommend based on your specific needs. Among the treatments they provide to restore your gum health:

  • Topical, time-release, or oral medication
  • Scaling and root planing, non-surgical deep cleaning procedures which remove plaque and tartar above and below the gum line, and smooth tooth roots to remove bacteria and help the gum tissue reattach to the teeth
  • Flap surgery to treat persistent gum infection, reduce pocket depth, and re-secure the gums snugly around the teeth
  • Bone grafts, gum grafts, and other regenerative procedures which help restore and repair tissue damaged by gum disease

If your dentist recommends a periodontal consultation, be proactive. The best way to protect yourself from the serious consequences of untreated gum disease is to see a specialist in this field. Your periodontist has the knowledge and experience to stop gum disease from progressing, treat damaged bone and gum tissue, and restore your healthy smile.

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