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What are mini implants used for?

May 23rd, 2017

The use of mini dental implants (MDIs) is on the rise. MDIs are about the diameter of a toothpick (1.8 to 2.9 millimeters with lengths between ten to 18 millimeters) and are primarily used to secure loose upper or lower dentures or partial dentures.

MDIs are particularly useful for patients who suffer from osteoporosis or otherwise aren't well enough to get the bone grafts sometimes required by traditional dental implants. Their diminutive size also allows them to replace smaller teeth where the placement of a dental implant isn't feasible or called for.

Some of the benefits of MDIs include:

  • The procedure is quicker and less invasive – Since MDIs don’t require the cutting of gum tissue or sutures, Dr. Dalessandro can place the implant quickly, resulting in a shorter healing process. MDIs go directly through the gum tissue and into the jawbone.
  • Lower cost – MDIs run in the range of $500 to $1500, whereas traditional dental implants can cost around $4,000.
  • Less risk of surgical error – Since MDIs don't go as deep into the tissue or jawbone, there is less risk of surgical error, like hitting a nerve or sinus cavity.
  • Can be used in thinner areas of the jawbone – Since MDIs don't require as much gum tissue or jawbone, they can be used in thinner areas of the jawbone, where a traditional dental implant would require a bone graft.

Although there are many advantages to MDIs, they aren't for everyone or every situation. There are some drawbacks, especially when it comes to their durability and stability. MDIs also haven't been studied nearly as much as dental implants.

Whatever your situation, it's best to speak with Dr. Dalessandro about your options, and whether an MDI or a dental implant would work best for your specific case. Schedule an appointment at our Hoffman Estates, IL office to learn more.

How to Properly Store Your Toothbrush

May 16th, 2017

Have you ever thought about how you're cleaning and storing your toothbrush when you're not using it? Did you know that the way you store your toothbrush could have an affect on your oral health? In this post, we'll look at some steps you can take to maximize toothbrush cleanliness and minimize bacteria.

Below are some tips from Dr. Dalessandro for toothbrush use and storage:

  • Don't share your toothbrush – This may seem obvious, but sharing a toothbrush exposes both users to bacteria and microorganisms from the other user, which can increase chances of infection. You should also avoid storing your toothbrush in the same container as other people’s toothbrushes.
  • Thoroughly rinse your toothbrush after each use – Rinsing your toothbrush well under running water will help remove food particles, toothpaste, and other debris from the bristles of your brush.
  • Store your toothbrush in an open-air container not a sealed one – Putting a wet toothbrush in a sealed container creates a favorable environment for microorganisms and bacteria.
  • Soak your toothbrush in an antibacterial mouthwash after use – There is some evidence to suggest that soaking your toothbrush in an antibacterial solution may reduce the amount of bacteria present on the toothbrush.
  • Change your toothbrush every three months – The bristles of your toothbrush become less effective and frayed after repeated use so it's a good idea to replace it on a regular basis. It's also wise to replace it after you've been sick.

There are many simple things you can do to make your oral-care regimen as clean as possible. Use common sense when storing your toothbrush—don't put it in a dirty place like the edge of your sink or in the shower (please, not by the toilet!), and keep it upright in a cool dry place—and you're usually good to go. If your toothbrush is looking a little worse for wear, drop by our Hoffman Estates, IL office and we'll be glad to provide you with a new one!

Does chronic stress impact periodontal health?

May 9th, 2017

Many studies over the past several years have focused on this question. Since we will all face stressful situations during our life, it is a good question to ask. This question also delves into the mind-body connection—the psychological having an effect on the physical and vice versa.

Studies were performed as far back as the 1940s and continue today. Many of them have shown that stress "downregulates" or hinders cellular immune response. The most common periodontal diseases related to this stress-induced downregulation are gingivitis and periodontitis.

It is believed that stress and depression contribute to a state of chronic inflammation within the body. Stress also raises levels of cortisol in your body, which has been linked in studies to higher levels of tooth loss and deeper pockets between the gums and teeth.

Perhaps the biological side of this equation makes sense, but an important factor is that people who are stressed and/or depressed tend to neglect oral hygiene and other health-promoting activities. The studies seem to support both the behavioral and biological effects as risk factors for periodontal disease.

Here are some things you can do to help prevent stress-related periodontal problems:

  • Daily relaxation –You may consider meditation or yoga. Both have been proven effective at easing stress.
  • Practice good oral hygiene – Don't let your oral hygiene fall by the wayside. Doing so will obviously have a detrimental effect on your oral health. You should also aim to quit smoking if you do smoke.
  • Get regular dental checkups – Getting regular checkups will help you to spot anything that's amiss before it gets out of hand. You can speak with your dentist if you have any pain or concerns and have them take a look.

Stress is something that affects all of us but it can be managed. Each one of us may manage it in a different way. Find what works for you and always make sure to keep up with your oral hygiene routine. For more information about stress-related periodontal issues, schedule an appointment with Dr. Dalessandro at our Hoffman Estates, IL office.

How a High-Tech Office Helps Your Periodontal Treatment

May 2nd, 2017

Today's periodontal office is a very different place than it was in the past. Yes, perhaps the same issues are still being treated, but it's the way in which they are treated which has changed drastically. Now patients with periodontal disease (gum disease) have more options.

What patients must understand is that gum disease is an infection that progresses in stages. First it affects gum tissue, and then it moves to the bones supporting the teeth, which then progresses to loss of teeth if left untreated. The main goal of treatment is to control this infection before it becomes more serious or painful.

Cutting-edge technologies used by Dr. Dalessandro now allow gum disease to be treated non-surgically, which is a huge advantage for patients who don't want to get gum surgery, can't afford it, or simply aren't good candidates for it. Here are some of the ways in which our office implements the latest in periodontal technologies:

  • Ultrasound gum treatments –An ultrasonic cleaning device is used to break apart stubborn plaque and tartar, as well as bacteria. The tool vibrates at a high frequency while simultaneously spraying a thin stream of water. The stream is sprayed around the teeth and at the gum line to clean and help prevent the bacterial buildup that leads to gum disease.
  • Laser therapy – A tiny diode laser is aimed at the gum line to kill disease-causing bacteria. This method is able to penetrate into the pockets between the teeth and gums, all with minimal discomfort and no surgery whatsoever.
  • Panoramic X-rays – These X-rays give us a much more detailed view of your mouth and the structures that support it than traditional dental X-rays. The machine spins around your head 360 degrees to produce a digital X-ray in a matter of seconds. We're then able to refer to this digital image on the computer for effective and precise treatment planning.
  • Intraoral camera – The head of this device contains a small camera used to show you what we see. It produces a live feed on the monitor so you get a better understanding of the issues in your mouth. This way we can better explain how we will go about treating them and what you can do about them, too.

Patients suffering from gum disease have more options and help than ever before. If you are currently a patient or would like to know about the treatment options we offer, please speak with one of our staff members or contact our Hoffman Estates, IL office.

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