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The Origins of Valentine's Day

February 12th, 2019

When we think of Valentine’s Day, we think of cards, flowers, and chocolates. We think of girlfriends celebrating being single together and couples celebrating their relationship. We think of all things pink and red taking over every pharmacy and grocery store imaginable. But what Dr. Dalessandro and our team would like to think of is when and how this joyous, love-filled day began.

Several martyrs’ stories are associated with the origins of Valentine’s Day. One of the most widely known suggests that Valentine was a Roman priest who went against the law at a time when marriage had been banned for young men. He continued to perform marriage ceremonies for young lovers in secret and when he was discovered, he was sentenced to death.

Another tale claims that Valentine was killed for helping Christians escape from Roman prisons. Yet another says that Valentine himself sent the first valentine when he fell in love with a girl and sent her a letter and signed it, “From your Valentine.”

Other claims suggest that it all began when Geoffrey Chaucer, an Englishman often referred to as the father of English literature, wrote a poem that was the first to connect St. Valentine to romance. From there, it evolved into a day when lovers would express their feelings for each other. Cue the flowers, sweets, and cards!

Regardless of where the holiday came from, these stories all have one thing in common: They celebrate the love we are capable of as human beings. And though that’s largely in a romantic spirit these days, it doesn’t have to be. You could celebrate love for a sister, a friend, a parent, even a pet.

We hope all our patients know how much we love them! Wishing you all a very happy Valentine’s Day from the team at Dalessandro Implants & Periodontics!

Restore Your Gums to a Healthier, More Natural State with Osseous Surgery

February 5th, 2019

Gum disease starts quietly and invisibly, but can lead to very serious and noticeable consequences if left untreated. Excess plaque and bacteria around the gum line cause irritation. This irritation can result in the gums pulling away from the teeth. When the gums pull away, they leave pockets between the gums and teeth which become home to more bacteria, leading to more irritation and infection. Gum pockets can get larger, resulting in more severe irritation and infection that can lead to bone loss around the tooth and eventually loss of the tooth itself.

The good news is that we can intervene at any of these stages to provide the periodontal care which will help restore your gums and teeth to health.  One of the procedures we use is osseous surgery. “Osseous” refers to bone tissue, and this treatment works to restore the bone structures supporting your teeth if gum disease has damaged or weakened them.

Healthy gums fit tightly around the teeth, keeping bacteria from affecting the roots and bone. Small pockets can be cleaned in our Hoffman Estates, IL office and plaque removed from tooth areas normally hidden by the gums. But if the pocket has become too deep, normal home and even office cleanings cannot fully treat the gum and bone tissue involved. The bone which holds our teeth securely in our jaws can become pitted and irregular. Osseous surgery can be used not only to clean the area, but to restore gum and bone tissue to health.

After an anesthetic numbs the area, your periodontist will fold back the gum tissue around the affected tooth and bone. The gums will be carefully cleaned. If the bone has become pitted, this offers bacteria another place to grow and cause damage to your tooth structures. We will smooth damaged areas of the bone to their natural shape, where your gum tissue will find it easier to attach to the healthy bone. When we have finished, the gums will be secured around the tooth. After surgery, the pockets will be reduced in size, and you should be able to return to a normal routine of regular gum care.

We know the idea of oral surgery can be intimidating, so talk Dr. Dalessandro us about osseous surgery if it has been recommended for you. We are experienced in preventing gum disease from causing more damage, and in gently restoring your gums and bone to health for your most attractive and lasting smile.

Toothbrush Arts and Crafts

January 29th, 2019

When you replace your old toothbrush every three or four months with a new model, you accomplish three things:

  • You keep your teeth cleaner (frayed brushes don’t clean as well)
  • You protect your gums (you won’t be scrubbing harder to get your teeth clean)
  • You add another toothbrush to your growing collection of used brushes

If creative recycling is one of your talents, you might have already discovered how handy repurposed brushes are for cleaning delicate or hard-to-reach spaces around the house. But those old brushes don’t have to spend their entire existence cleaning! Here are some ideas from Dr. Dalessandro to give a new, artistic life to your old, uninspired toothbrush.

  • Splatter Painting

As your bathroom mirror can confirm, toothbrushes are great for splattering. Why not put those bristles to creative use by adding color bursts to canvas, wooden picture frames or boxes, fabric, cards, gift wrap and more? Just dip the tips of the bristles into the paint, point them toward your surface, and brush your finger over the head. For more formal effects, splatter paint over your favorite stencils on paper or fabric. Or work your magic by splattering around a stencil for a dramatic silhouette.

  • Children’s Painting

Your child might find it great fun to use an old toothbrush to create new works of art. The easy-to-grip handle and wide bristles are perfect for painting those first masterpieces. Splatter painting is also a wonderful art activity for children—but be prepared for some clean-up!

Texturizing Clay Pieces

Whether you work in potter’s clay, polymer clay, or Play-Doh, an old toothbrush can provide any number of interesting textures to your piece. Press the bristles into the clay for a sophisticated stippled background, or brush long gentle strokes for a striated effect.

  • Carpentry

Wood glue creates strong bonds when you are joining edges, mitering corners, or fitting mortise and tenon joints. It also creates a sticky mess when you use your fingers, a wood or plastic spreader, or one of your good paint brushes. For any gluing jobs or joinery, try a toothbrush for greater control and easy application.

  • Jewelry Making

If you work with jewelry pieces, you know that sometimes there are nooks and crannies that are almost impossible to clean or polish. Try a gentle brush with an old toothbrush and the recommended polish for your piece—but do keep brushes away from the delicate surface of pearls. And for the boldly creative, why not use your toothbrush itself as jewelry? There are online instructions out there for transforming that old brush into a colorful bangle bracelet.

In turns out that there’s a second career waiting for your toothbrush after all! Make sure to clean your toothbrushes thoroughly before using them in another role. After that, let your creativity run wild—including your creative recycling! It’s just another way you are crafting a more beautiful environment for all of us.

How Crown Lengthening Can Improve Your Smile

January 22nd, 2019

“Crown lengthening”? Probably not an expression most of us are familiar with! In fact, this is a common periodontal procedure designed to improve both the health and the appearance of our smiles by revealing more of the tooth surface usually hidden by our gums.

What is Crown Lengthening?

The “crown” is the part of our tooth covered by enamel, while the “lengthening” is actually the result of revealing more of the tooth. Usually, Dr. Dalessandro will use a local anesthetic to numb the area, and remove gum tissue from the base of a specific tooth or teeth. If necessary, a small amount of bone tissue might be removed from the base of the tooth as well. This process exposes more tooth surface. When the ideal tooth length is visible, the tissue around it is then shaped for an even appearance and the repositioned gum tissue is often sutured in place. We will always tailor this treatment to your specific needs, so talk to us about our treatment plan for you. We will explain the surgery, after care, and follow-up visits.

Why Consider Crown Lengthening?

  • To Repair an Injured Tooth

Sometimes a tooth suffers an injury that makes it impossible to repair without crown lengthening. If a tooth is broken off at the gumline, or suffers a fracture that extends to the gumline, more of the tooth will need to be exposed so that there is enough remaining natural tooth to support a crown. Similarly, this procedure might also be necessary for a filling if decay has affected the tooth near the gumline. Crown lengthening can enable us to perform a restoration and save a tooth where an extraction might otherwise take place.

  • For Cosmetic Improvement

An excess of gum tissue can lead to a “gummy” smile. Crown lengthening can reduce extra gum tissue and, if needed, bone tissue, to provide you with a well-proportioned smile. The gum tissue will be contoured for an even, attractive gumline. This process is carefully designed to create a balance of lips, teeth, and gums for your most appealing smile. Crown lengthening might also be advisable if more tooth surface is needed for veneers.

Call our Hoffman Estates, IL office if you have any questions about this procedure, whether for restorative or cosmetic reasons. “Crown lengthening” might be a term you’ve never heard before. But it might be exactly the procedure you need to ensure healthy teeth and a beautiful smile.

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